Exhibitions

Tour Schedule for the Exhibition “I Want the Wide American Earth”

First six banners of the exhibition “I Want the Wide American Earth: An Asian Pacific American Story.”

This schedule will be updated frequently as we get more venue confirmations. If you are interested in hosting the exhibition or bringing it to your city, click here for more details. There are two copies of the banner exhibition available to be toured. The first list includes confirmed or tentative venues, the second list has dates that are open to be reserved.

Confirmed and Tentative:

2013

  • May 1, 2013—August 25, 2013
    Smithsonian National Museum of American History
    Washington, DC
  • September 14, 2013—December 1, 2013
    Japanese American National Museum
    Los Angeles, CA

2014

  • December 21, 2013—March 2, 2014
    Four Rivers Cultural Center and Museum
    Ontario, OR
  • March 22, 2014—June 1, 2014
    Minnesota History Center
    St. Paul, MN

    Second venue:
    ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai’i (Tentative)
    Hilo, HI

  • June 21, 2014August 31, 2014
    Kansas City Public Library (Tentative)
    Kansas City, MO
  • September 20, 2014—November 30, 2014
    Idaho Museum of Natural History
    Pocatello, ID

2015

  • December 20, 2014—May 31, 2015
    Riverside Metropolitan Museum (Tentative)
    Riverside, CA
  • June 20, 2015August 30, 2015
    Community Memorial Museum of Sutter County (Tentative)
    Yuba City, CA
  • September 19, 2015November 29, 2015
    Asian American Resource Center, City of Austin Parks and Recreation (Tentative)
    Austin, TX

2016

  • December 19, 2015February 28, 2016
    Memorial Union Concourse Gallery (Tentative)
    Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR
  • March 19, 2016May 29, 2016
    Park City Museum
    Park City, UT
  • June 18, 2016August 28, 2016
    Houston Public Library (Tentative)
    Houston, TX
  • September 17, 2016November 27, 2016
    Greensboro Historical Museum (Tentative)
    Greensboro, NC

Open Dates:


2014

  • September 20, 2014—November 30, 2014

2015

  • December 20, 2014—March 1, 2015
  • March 21, 2015—May 31, 2015
  • June 20, 2015—August 30, 2015
  • September 19, 2015—November 29, 2015

2016

  • December 19, 2015—February 28, 2016
  • March 19, 2016—May 29, 2016
  • June 18, 2016—August 28, 2016
  • September 17, 2016—November 27, 2016
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Exhibitions

Mobile App for “I Want the Wide American Earth”

Preview screenshots of the app.

Download our free app via iTunes or search for “Wide Earth” on your iPhone or iPad.

The Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center is proud to launch our very first mobile app! This mobile tour accompanies our banner exhibition I Want the Wide American Earth: An Asian Pacific American Story with supplementary audio, video, and images. Taking Carlos Bulosan’s poem as inspiration, this exhibition tells the stories of the brave, the proud builders and workers of Asian Pacific America. The exhibition will travel to museums and cultural institutions across the country starting in September 2013. It is now on view at the National Museum of American History on the third floor. Photos are online of the exhibition opening and tour.

This exhibition was created by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center in collaboration with the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES) and was made possible by a generous grant from the W. K. Kellogg Foundation.

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Exhibitions

Education Resources for the Congressional Gold Medal Experience

Screenshot of the educational videos.

A new curriculum for educators at the high school, middle, and elementary level is now online to accompany the exhibition American Heroes: Japanese American World War II Nisei Soldiers and the Congressional Gold Medal. The curriculum is aligned to the new Common Core standards.

Visit cgm.si.edu

Grade Range: 3-12

Description:

Nearly seven decades after the beginning of World War II, the Congressional Gold Medal was bestowed on the Japanese American men who served with bravery and valor on the battlefield, even while their families were held in internment camps by the very country for which they fought. Through videos, discussion forums, and three lesson plans, the Congressional Gold Medal Experience site focuses on how the stories of the honorees reflect outstanding character traits, such as courage and perseverance. This site was produced through collaboration between the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center and the National Veterans Network.

Links to the Lesson Plans:

  • High School Project-Based Lesson Plan
    This is a high school project-based lesson plan about character education and Japanese American World War II veterans’ history. In this lesson, teams of students will create their own short, five-to-ten minute documentary movies that contains both historical and contemporary stories about a specific character value. This lesson takes approximately two to three weeks to complete.
  • Middle/High School Online Lesson Plan
    This is a middle and high school lesson plan about character education and Japanese American World War II veterans’ history. In this lesson, students will create and share their personal stories and other relevant stories about character. This is a flexible, online lesson in which any part of the lesson can be taught online or in-person. This lesson takes approximately one to two hours to complete.
  • Elementary School Lesson Plan
    This is a lesson plan for grades 3 to 5 about character education and Japanese American World War II veterans’ history. In this lesson, students will create their own personal medal about a specific character value. This lesson takes approximately one day to complete.

Related Links:

Additional Education Resource

Honor & Sacrifice: The Roy Matsumoto Story

The film is about Roy Matsumoto who served as a Japanese language intelligence specialist with Merrill’s Marauders in the Burma Campaign during World War II. We also house Mr. Matsumoto’s documents at the Smithsonian.

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Exhibitions

Poster Set for I Want the Wide American Earth: An Asian Pacific American Story

Click to enlarge photo of the poster set.

The Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center is offering an 8-poster set based on the exhibition “I Want the Wide American Earth: An Asian Pacific American Story” to commemorate the celebration of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month. The exhibition and the poster set celebrate Asian Pacific American history across a multitude of incredibly diverse cultures and explore how Asian Pacific Americans have shaped and been shaped by the course of our nation’s history. Rich with compelling, often surprising stories, this set of educational posters takes a sweeping look at this history, from the very first Asian immigrants to the influx of highly skilled workers many decades later. The exhibition is now on display at the National Museum of American History.

The posters offer students, regardless of heritage and family history, the opportunity to be engaged and inspired through related activities and lessons in social studies, creative writing, art, and communications. It is also meant to enhance or serve as a study guide after viewing the exhibition. The posters can be displayed at schools, universities, libraries, community centers, or at federal agencies during the commemoration of Asian Pacific American Heritage month. If you would like to receive a poster set by mail, please send your mailing address to APAC@si.edu.

Related Links

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Art, Exhibitions, Indian American

Call for Art Submissions

The Indian American Heritage Project of Smithsonian’s Asian Pacific American Center is looking for artists to create works that use the visual of the H1-B visa as a motif or inspiration and comment upon the experience of temporary and tenuous immigration status for Indian immigrants in the United States.  Themes such as migration, transnational identity, diaspora, economy, outsourcing and the role and reach of technology can also be explored.

Concepts are due
Midnight, March 31

Final works should be no larger than 6’ by 6’ and must mount on a gallery wall.  All media are welcome, including:

  • Graphic Design
  • Painting
  • Drawing
  • Printing
  • Collage
  • Photography
  • Mixed Media

Interested artists should submit a concept, including a detailed written description and sketches/images by midnight EST on Sunday, March 31, 2013 to Curator Masum Momaya at MomayaM@si.edu with the subject line “H1-B”.

Upon review of concept submissions by Smithsonian curatorial staff, a small number of artists will be asked to create the final work and submit digital representations of it by 5pm EST on Friday, May 31,2013.

Digital representations will be displayed by Smithsonian’s Asian Pacific American Center in an online gallery, and the winning work will be featured in an upcoming exhibition, Beyond Bollywood: Indian Americans Shape the Nation at the National Museum of Natural History from December 2013 through January 2015.

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Exhibitions, Japanese American

Congressional Gold Medal Tour

Press Release: Smithsonian Tour of Congressional Gold Medal Awarded to Japanese American World War II Veterans Kicks Off This Month in New Orleans

via newsdesk.si.edu

The Congressional Gold Medal awarded in 2011 to Japanese American, or Nisei, World War II veterans in recognition of their extraordinary accomplishments will begin its tour across the country, beginning with the National World War II Museum, a Smithsonian Affiliate, in New Orleans. The medal will debut there during a special weekend of opening festivities for the new U.S. Freedom Pavilion: The Boeing Center, Jan. 12, and will remain on view through Feb. 17, before continuing on to six other cities in 2013. The Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES) has partnered with the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History and the National Veterans Network to share the inspiring story of these men who fought with bravery and valor on the battlefields of Europe and Asia, even while many of their family members were held in American internment camps back in the U.S.

The medal will be accompanied by an iPad application, social-learning website and curriculum available at cgm.si.edu. This educational package, available Jan. 12, was developed by the National Veterans Network in partnership with the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. Centered on the character values associated with Japanese American veterans—courage, respect, humility, perseverance, compassion and citizenship—these materials will provide users with a constantly growing social-learning community.

The Congressional Gold Medal was awarded to the 100th Infantry Battalion, the 442nd Regimental Combat Team and the Military Intelligence Service veterans by the U.S. Congress Nov. 2, 2011, in recognition of their exceptional service, sacrifice and loyalty to America. The Gold Medal represents Congress’s highest expression of national appreciation for distinguished achievements and contributions. A complete list of recipients is available at House.gov.

Commonly known as the “Go For Broke” regiments, the 100th/442nd is one of the most highly decorated units in U.S. military history, having earned more than 4,000 Purple Hearts, 560 Silver Stars, seven Presidential Unit Citations and 21 Medals of Honor. The MIS, whose highly specialized contributions helped hasten the end of the war, was honored with a Presidential Unit Citation in 2000. More than 19,000 Japanese American soldiers served in these units during World War II.

After New Orleans, the tour will bring the Nisei Congressional Gold Medal to more top museums in the country, including the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum in Honolulu, the Japanese American National Museum, a Smithsonian Affiliate in Los Angeles, the De Young Museum in San Francisco, the Oregon History Museum in Portland, the Chicago History Museum in Chicago and the Holocaust Museum in Houston. At the conclusion of the tour, the Congressional Gold Medal will be on permanent display in “The Price of Freedom” exhibition at the National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C.

“American Heroes: Japanese American World War II Nisei Soldiers and the Congressional Gold Medal” is made possible by the support of AARP, Cole Chemical, Comcast/NBC Universal, the Japanese American Veterans Association, Pritzker Military Library, the Shiratsuki Family and Southwest Airlines.

The National Veterans Network is a coalition of Japanese American veteran and civic organizations representing eight regions in the United States that advocates on a national level to educate and enlighten the public about the experience and legacy of the Japanese American World War II soldiers.

Related Links and Press:

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Art, Exhibitions

Asian American Portraits of Encounter Podcasts and Portraits After 5 Recap

Audio interviews of all seven artists from the Portraiture Now: Asian American Portraits of Encounter exhibition, on display through October 14, 2012 at the National Portrait Gallery (NPG), are available for download.  You can also download these files as podcasts via iTunes-U. Jasmine Fernandez, a Smithsonian APA Program intern, interviewed the artists at NPG.

Download CYJO’s (Cindy Hwang) Interview  (9 minutes, MP3 audio file)

Click to view more photos

CYJO's KYOPO Project (digital pigment print)

Download Hong Chun Zhang’s Interview (9 minutes, MP3 audio file)

Click to view more photos

Hong Chun Zhang's "Life Strands" (charcoal on paper)

Download Satomi Shirai’s Interview (5 minutes, MP3 audio file)

Click to view more photos

Satomi Shirai's "Fortune Telling" (digital chromogenic print)

Download Hye Yeon Nam’s Interview (9 minutes, MP3 audio file)

Click to view more photos

Hye Yeon Nam's "Self Portrait: Eating, Walking, Drinking, Sitting" (video compilation)

Download Roger Shimomura’s Interview (14 minutes, MP3 audio file)

Click to view more photos

Roger Shimomura's "Shimomura Crossing the Delaware" (acrylic on canvas)

Download Tam Tran’s Interview (8 minutes, MP3 audio file)

Click to view more photos

Tam Tran's "Youniverse" (digital print)

Download Shizu Saldamando’s Interview (12 minutes, MP3 audio file)

Click to view more photos

Shizu Saldamando's "Carm's Crew" (gold leaf and oil on wood)

Portraits After 5 Recap

Portraits After 5

Portraits After 5

Portraits After 5 was an evening event organized by the Smithsonian Resident Associate Program at the National Portrait Gallery on November 4, 2011. The event showcased the exhibition Portraiture Now: Asian American Portraits of Encounter and allowed participants to converse with exhibit curators and Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program staff. Two hundred tickets were sold and attendees enjoyed food and music in the Kogod Courtyard and had their portraits drawn by the Corcoran College of Art + Design students, which were added to the works from the collections being projected on the walls of the courtyard.

APA Program staff and friends at Portraits After 5.

APA Program staff and friends at Portraits After 5, a National Portrait Gallery "Mingle at the Museum" evening event on November 4, 2011.

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Exhibitions, General APA, Intern Update

RACE: Are We So Different? Exhibition at NMNH

RACE: Are We So Different?

Written by Stephanie Chang, Summer 2011 intern.

What is race?

This difficult and complex question is posed to all visitors at the beginning of the exhibition, RACE: Are We So Different?, at the National Museum of Natural History.  Visitors of all ages, many of different ethnic and racial backgrounds are thrust into an educationally packed exhibition that essentially boils down into three ideas:

1)     Race is a recent human invention.1
2)     Race is about culture, not biology.2
3)     Race and racism are embedded in our institutions and everyday life.3

These ideas are quite revolutionary, and certainly challenge most, if not all, social conventions today.  As an APA youth, I can safely say that my life has revolved around race.  Everywhere I go, my race precedes me.  People see the differences, think about the differences, and make sharp distinctions.  Likewise, I am just as guilty of these categorizations as well—I notice my differences, realize I am different, and I am sure that I, subconsciously, encourage these distinctions.  My race makes me who I am, what makes me unusual, and unique.  Race is what makes me different, a key factor that I use to define myself.

So to be told by this exhibition that race is a social construction and that humans are perhaps, more alike than different, most certainly gave a nice jolt to my nervous system.  Really, is race purely a human invention, unfettered from biological differences?  The visual differences between us are almost enough to seriously ponder this question—it is hard not to believe what the eyes tell you.  But I suppose this is what this exhibition is here for: to begin challenging these notions and to finally take a step towards unity and acceptance within the human race.

AALEAD Students and APAP Interns

AALEAD Students, Staff, and APAP Interns

The Asian Pacific American Program invited a group of 19 students from AALead to view and tour the exhibition, helping them challenge their ideas about race that were possibly similar to my own. AALEAD is a group based in the Maryland and D.C. area that focuses on leadership and empowerment within the APA youth community. The students, ranging from ages 11-14, worked through a scavenger hunt created by the APA Program interns. The activity took them through key stations addressing the main ideas of the exhibition.  Some were shocked at what they had found (“Cool—We’re all from Africa?!” one youth asked me), others seemed to just soak it all in.  At the end, they were asked to draw two objects. One was a locker depicting their ideas about race, ethnicity, and diversity (inspired by the lockers featured in the exhibition). The second drawing they were asked to make was a self-portrait similar to the style of the Hapa Project.  In this activity, I asked them to include a short reflection about themselves.  Many of their responses were rather insightful and downright inspiring.  One student wrote, “I don’t have any personal opinion toward any race and culture.  I just think any race is amazing.”  Another adorned her locker with the words, “Everyone is different. Race: We are all equal.”

It was an absolute delight to work with AALead.  The students showed a tremendous amount of thought and interest in the complex topic of race, demonstrating just how perceptive the youth of today actually are.  I am excited, along with the entire staff of the APA Program, to continue working with groups such as AALead.  In doing so, we hope to cultivate discussions about issues surrounding the community today and perhaps, begin to revolutionize the answer to the very question of what is race.

Click here to view more photos of APA Program interns giving tours to student groups visiting the RACE exhibition.


1 Beckrich, Amy, Gomez, Felicia, Jones, Josephy, and Overbey, Mary Margaret. (2007). Race: Are We So Different? A Family Guide to Talking About Race. American Anthropological Association.
2 Ibid.
3 Ibid.

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Chinese American, Exhibitions, HomeSpun, Staff Update

NewsChannel 8 Interview

NewsChannel 8 Interview

NewsChannel 8 Interview with Noriko Sanefuji and Sameen Piracha

Click here to watch the interview, it begins 29 minutes into the video.

APA Program staff members Noriko Sanefuji and Sameen Piracha appeared on NewsChannel 8 to discuss the Sweet & Sour display at the National Museum of American History and to raise awareness for the HomeSpun: Smithsonian Indian American Heritage Project.

Noriko Sanefuji is the APA Program Curatorial Assistant, National Museum of American History.
Sameen Piracha is the APA Program Development Specialist.

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Art, Exhibitions, General APA

Portraiture Now: Asian American Portraits of Encounter

Artwork from Portraits of Encounter

August 12, 2011 through
October 14, 2012
11:30 a.m. — 7:00 p.m. daily

Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery
8th and F Streets NW
Washington, DC 20001
Google Map

Metro: Gallery Place-Chinatown
Free admission

This installation of Portraiture Now will feature seven artists, each of whom will show several works. The artists are:

  • Cindy Hwang (CYJO), New York, Beijing
  • Hye Yeon Nam, Atlanta and New York
  • Shizu Saldamando, Los Angeles
  • Roger Shimomura, Lawrence, KS
  • Satomi Shirai, New York
  • Tam Tran, Memphis, TN
  • Hong Chun Zhang, Lawrence, KS

The Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery (NPG) and the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program have collaborated to mount the Smithsonian’s first major showcase of contemporary Asian American portraiture. Through the work of seven artists from across the country and around the world, the exhibition offers thought-provoking interpretations of the Asian American experience and representations against and beyond the stereotypes that have obscured the complexity of being Asian in America.

Hallway at NPG where the Asian American Portraits of Encounter exhibition begins.

Hallway at NPG where the exhibition begins.

To visit the exhibition, go to the museum lobby located on 8th and F Streets NW. The exhibition is located in the first hallway on your right.

“The Portraiture Now exhibition series showcases innovative trends in portraiture,” said Martin Sullivan, director of the National Portrait Gallery. “Portraiture Now: Asian American Portraits of Encounter is a provocative and pathbreaking show that affirms the complex realities of Asian identity in today’s culture.”

“These exceptional works are portals into the souls of the American experience, world cultures and their intersections,” said Konrad Ng, director of the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program. “Asian American Portraits of Encounter provides engaging points of view that will enrich the understanding of Asian Pacific America.”

Click to visit NPG's website for the exhibit

Click to visit NPG's website for the exhibit

Related Links

News and Press

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