Chinese American, Crafts, Event, Family, Film, General APA

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month – Family Day Celebration

Saturday, May 7, 2011
11 a.m. — 4 p.m.
First Floor
National Museum of American History
14th Street and Constitution Ave, NW
Washington, DC 20004

The Killing of a Chinese Cookie
Film screening begins at 1 p.m.

Metro: Federal Triangle or Smithsonian
This event is free and open to the public.

Bring the whole family to the Smithsonian’s kickoff celebration for Asian Pacific American Heritage Month! This day of activities centers on Sweet & Sour, a display that traces the evolution of Chinese food in the United States and the long history of Chinese immigration. Visitors can watch the film, The Killing of a Chinese Cookie, join a discussion with director Derek Shimoda, and participate in many hands-on activities. Children and their families can work with artist Sushmita Mazumdar to create a storybook illustrating a personal story from their own kitchen. Teens from the Hirshhorn’s ARTLAB+ video production program will then interview the children and record their stories, producing videos for the families and for posting on the site www.SmithsonianEducation.org/Heritage.  There will also be curator talks with Cedric Yeh, Deputy Chair and Associate Curator in the Division of Armed Forces History at NMAH. He is also the Co-Chair for the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Committee.

APA Heritage  Month

Schedule

11:00 a.m. Curator Talk with Cedric Yeh
Sweet & Sour exhibition case, East Special Artifact Wall
12:00 p.m. Curator Talk with Cedric Yeh
Sweet & Sour exhibition case, East Special Artifact Wall
1:00 p.m. Screening of The Killing of a Chinese Cookie
Followed by Q&A with film director Derek Shimoda
Carmichael Auditorium
3:00 p.m. DVD and book signing with Derek Shimoda and Sushmita Mazumdar
LeFrak Lobby, by entrance to Carmichael Auditorium
3:30 p.m. Curator Talk with Cedric Yeh
Sweet & Sour exhibition case, East Special Artifact Wall

Ongoing Activities

Handmade Storybooks with Sushmita Mazumdar
LeFrak Lobby, by entrance to Carmichael Auditorium
Starts on the hour and half hour

Make Clay Fortune Cookies
Activity area at Sweet & Sour exhibition case, East Special Artifact Wall
Special thanks to Meiwah Restaurant for their support of this activity.

Record Your Family Story on Camera
Presidential Suite, 12-2 p.m. and 2:30-4 p.m.
Special thanks to the Pearson Foundation for their support of this activity.

APA bookshelf at the American History Museum bookstore

APA bookshelf at the American History Museum bookstore

Chopsticks and Spices Carts
First Floor

Cookbook Sales
LeFrak Lobby, by entrance to Carmichael Auditorium

Special Asian Café Menu
Stars and Stripes Café, First Floor

Related Links:

Smithsonian Participants:

Southwest Airlines

Air travel for participants is provided by Southwest Airlines.


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Event, Film, Japanese American

Event Recap: 2011 Annual Day of Remembrance

DOR Panelists

DOR Panelists. From left: guest speaker Terry Shima (442nd RCT Veteran), film director Junichi Suzuki, and panel moderator Noriko Sanefuji. Photo by Sandra Vuong.

More than 200 people attended the screening of Junichi Suzuki’s film 442: Live with Honor, Die with Dignity at the Smithsonian Institution’s Annual Day of Remembrance on Saturday, February 19, 2011, at the Carmichael Auditorium, National Museum of American History. The program commemorated the 69th anniversary of the signing of Executive Order 9066 by President Franklin D. Roosevelt that led to the imprisonment of 120,000 Americans of Japanese ancestry during World War II.

Director Junichi Suzuki signing DVDs

Director Junichi Suzuki signing DVDs after the film screening. Photo by Jim McCallum.

As a freelance film director and producer from Japan, Junichi Suzuki provided a unique perspective on the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, an Asian American unit composed mostly of Japanese Americans that became the most decorated U.S. Regiment of World War II. Through this significant film, Suzuki hopes to share the relatively unknown history and legacy of the 442nd to both Japanese and American audiences.

Terry Shima joined the panel discussion as a surviving 442nd veteran. After returning home from the war, Shima recounted the 442nd’s march down Constitution Avenue where they were received by President Harry S. Truman at the Ellipse. In his message to the troops on July 15, 1946, President Truman declared “you fought not only the enemy but you fought prejudice—and you have won.”1 Despite internment, the 442nd affirmed their loyalty to the U.S. by heroically fighting in combat and risking their lives.  Their victory abroad was a victory at home.

To find out more about this inspiring film, please visit www.442film.com

This public program was sponsored by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program, National Museum of American History, National Japanese American Memorial Foundation, Japanese American Citizens League, and the Japanese American Veterans Association.

Sources:
1
“Japanese Americans In America’s Wars: A Chronology | Japanese American National Museum.” Home | Japanese American National Museum. Web. 04 Mar. 2011. <http://www.janm.org/nrc/resources/militarych/>.

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Event, Film, Japanese American, Lecture

2011 Annual Day of Remembrance at the Smithsonian

442: Live with Honor, Die with Dignity
Film Screening and Discussion with Director Junichi Suzuki

Saturday, February 19, 2011
Film Begins at 2PM 

Carmichael Auditorium
National Museum of American History
14th Street & Constitution Avenue, NW

This event is free and open to the public

To observe the 69th anniversary of the signing of Executive Order 9066 by President Franklin D. Roosevelt which led to the imprisonment of 120,000 Americans of Japanese ancestry during World War II, the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program and the National Japanese American Memorial Foundation, present the film 442: Live with Honor, Die with Dignity at the Smithsonian Institution. This film, directed by Junichi Suzuki, narrates the history and legacy of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, known as the most decorated US Regiment during WWII. In addition to the use of archival footage, the film includes interviews with several surviving veterans including United States Senator Daniel K. Inouye and George Sakato. Both veterans were recipients of the Medal of Honor, the highest military decoration awarded by the U.S. government. A forum with the director, Junichi Suzuki, will follow the screening. 

Co-sponsors of the program include the Japanese American Citizens League, the Japanese American Veterans Association, and Southwest Airlines.

Director Junichi Suzuki

Director Junichi Suzuki

Auditorium info:
The Carmichael Auditorium is on the first floor of the National Museum of American History, near the museum entrance facing Constitution Avenue.

Charmichael Auditorium

Parking info:
Please click here to download a PDF for more details on where to park at the Smithsonian.

Metro ClosingsClosest Metro:
Smithsonian and Federal Triangle stations will be closed for the weekend.  Please use Metro Center or L’Enfant Plaza stations.

Metrorail Closings for Presidents Day Weekend:
Blue and Orange Lines – No train service between Metro Center and  L’Enfant Plaza.  Federal Triangle and Smithsonian stations will be closed from February 19 – 21.
Click here for more information

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Event, Film

Film Screening: Enter the Dragon Recap

Film  Screening: Enter the Dragon | Photo: PHOTOFEST

Martial arts movie icon Bruce Lee would have turned 70 in 2010. The Freer Gallery of Art honored this legendary performer with a screening of one of his classics and an exclusive dance performance by a choreographer inspired by his work. The Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program and the University of Wisconsin-Madison Provost’s Office and Graduate School presented the first event in this two-part series, a film screening of Enter the Dragon.

Bruce Lee’s most popular film also served as his epitaph: he died shortly after filming it. He plays a master Shaolin warrior sent to infiltrate the fortress of a villainous former Shaolin disciple under the guise of participating in a martial arts contest. A big-budget Hollywood production set mostly in Hong Kong, it shows off Lee’s astonishing physical abilities and abundant charisma in a succession of dazzling fight scenes. As film critic Jeffrey M. Anderson writes in Combustible Celluloid, “It’s easy to see why Lee was — and still is — such a big star. He had a charm and charisma that few have. The camera loved him. He had that special undefinable quality that James Dean, Marilyn Monroe, Humphrey Bogart and a few others have.” (Dir., Robert Clouse, United States, 1973, 99 min.)

Related Event—Power Moves: From Bruce Lee’s Intercepting Fist to Hip Hop and Beyond.
The second event in this two-part series features choreographer/dancer Peggy Choy as she re-envisions the legacy of martial artist and film star Bruce Lee, through presentation of her recent work that fuses Asian martial arts with diverse forms of dance from Korean court dance to hip-hop. Choy and her dancers generate a vivid playing field of dynamic movement while exploring Bruce Lee’s intentions behind creating Jeet Kune Do or “the way of the intercepting fist”.
See the original listing of this event by clicking here.
See photos from this event by clicking here.

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Chinese American, Event, Film, General APA

Film Screening: Enter the Dragon

Film Screening: Enter the Dragon | Photo: PHOTOFEST

Martial arts movie icon Bruce Lee would have turned 70 in 2010. The Freer Gallery of Art honors this legendary performer with a screening of one of his classics and an exclusive dance performance by a choreographer inspired by his work. The Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program and the University of Wisconsin-Madison Provost’s Office and Graduate School are proud to present the first event in this two-part series, a film screening of Enter the Dragon.

Time:
Friday, December 10, 2010
7:00 p.m. 

Location:
Meyer Auditorium
Freer Gallery of Art
Jefferson Drive at 12th Street, SW

Metro:
Smithsonian
(Blue or Orange line)

This event is free and open to the public.

Bruce Lee’s most popular film also served as his epitaph: he died shortly after filming it. He plays a master Shaolin warrior sent to infiltrate the fortress of a villainous former Shaolin disciple under the guise of participating in a martial arts contest. A big-budget Hollywood production set mostly in Hong Kong, it shows off Lee’s astonishing physical abilities and abundant charisma in a succession of dazzling fight scenes. As film critic Jeffrey M. Anderson writes in Combustible Celluloid, “It’s easy to see why Lee was — and still is — such a big star. He had a charm and charisma that few have. The camera loved him. He had that special undefinable quality that James Dean, Marilyn Monroe, Humphrey Bogart and a few others have.” (Dir., Robert Clouse, United States, 1973, 99 min.)

Related Event—Power Moves: From Bruce Lee’s Intercepting Fist to Hip Hop and Beyond.
The second event in this two-part series features choreographer/dancer Peggy Choy as she re-envisions the legacy of martial artist and film star Bruce Lee, through presentation of her recent work that fuses Asian martial arts with diverse forms of dance from Korean court dance to hip-hop. Choy and her dancers generate a vivid playing field of dynamic movement while exploring Bruce Lee’s intentions behind creating Jeet Kune Do or “the way of the intercepting fist”.
Meyer Auditorium, Freer Gallery of Art. Sunday, December 12, 2010, 2:00 p.m.
Website: Power Moves: From Bruce Lee’s Intercepting Fist to Hip Hop and Beyond

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Chinese American, Event, Film, Indian American, Literary, South Asian

SALTAF 2010, South Asian Literary and Theatre Arts Festival Recap

South Asian Literary and Theater Arts Festival 2010

Co-Chairs: Kiran Meegada, Latha Reddy, Mridula Srinivasan
Contact: saltaf@netsap.org

The Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program and NetSAP-DC presented the tenth annual South Asian Literary and Theater Arts Festival (SALTAF). The partnership between NetSAP and the Smithsonian has established SALTAF as a premier showcase for South Asian-themed literary and theater arts in North America.

This past festival’s schedule can be found if you click here.

SALTAF 2010 | Photo by Manish Alimchandani

This year’s festival featured panel discussions, readings, and film screenings by internationally acclaimed writers and artists, including:

  • Award-winning writer Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni is the bestselling author of Arranged Marriage, One Amazing Thing, and other novels which focus on the themes of women, immigration, and the South Asian experience. She teaches Creative Writing at the University of Houston.
  • Born in Sri Lanka and educated at Oxford, the San Francisco-based poet Pireeni Sundaralingam is a PEN USA Rosenthal Fellow. She is also the editor of the first anthology of contemporary South Asian American poetry, Indivisible, as well as the author of the forthcoming Margin Lands.
  • Writer and artist Naeem Mohaiemen‘s photography and video projects have shown at venues such as Laboral Center for Art & Technology and Zurich Shedhalle, and will show next at Sharjah Biennial 2011. He is editor of the just published Between Ashes and Hope: Chittagong Hill Tracts in the Blind Spot of Bangladesh Nationalism.
  • Washington, DC-based journalist Rajiv Chandrasekaran, author of the acclaimed Imperial Life in the Emerald City, is National Editor at The Washington Post. He has written extensively on the Middle East and has been widely praised for his reporting on that region.
  • The San-Francisco-based writer, performer, and activist Canyon Sam, author of the 2010 PEN-award winning lyrical memoir Sky Train, has performed across the United States and Canada. Her creative nonfiction has been published in numerous periodicals and anthologies.

The two films showcased were:

Shakti Rising (Shakti Pirakkudhu), created in association with writer and director Usha Rajeswari of Prakriti Jiva Media, is a special tribute to the undying spirit and power of women throughout the world. Based on the true-life stories of a group of women from Madurai, India and their association with Madura Micro Finance Ltd., this inspirational film offers a case study of success and triumph.

Udaan, created in association with director Vikramaditya Motwane and producers Sanjay Singh, Anurag Kashyap, and Ronnie Screwvala, is a story about 17-year-old Rohan who is expelled from boarding school and returns home to his stern and abusive father. Rohan has dreams of becoming a writer but is instead forced to work in his father’s metalworks factory and attend engineering classes at a local university. From the ashes of conflict Rohan has to decide whether or not his dream of becoming a writer is too strong to give up.

See photos by Manish Alimchandani from this year’s event by clicking here.
See the original event listing by clicking here.

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Event, Film, Indian American, Literary

SALTAF 2010, South Asian Literary and Theatre Arts Festival Program Schedule

South    Asian Literary and Theater Arts Festival 2010

10:00 – 10:15 Registration
10:15 – 10:20 Opening remarks (Dr. Richard Kurin, Under Secretary of History, Art, and Culture & Acting Director of the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program)
10:20 – 10:25 Introductory Remarks and Program Announcements by 2010 SALTAF co-chairs
10:30 – 11:30 Panel 1: Global (Dis)Placements
Canyon Sam
Naeem Mohaiemen
Rajiv Chandrasekaran
 

11:35 – 12:35 Book Signings by the Museum Book Store : Naeem, Rajiv, Canyon 

11:30 – 11:40 ~Break~ 

11:40 –  1:30 Movie 1: Shakti Rising 

1:30 – 1:50 Panel discussion with Dr. Tara Thiagarajan, Director – Usha Rajeswari 

1:50 – 2:00 ~Break~ 

2:00 – 2:55 Panel 2: The Poetics of Placement
Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni
Pireeni Sundaralingam
 

2:55 – 3:00 ~Break~ 

3:00 – 4:00 Book Signings by the Museum Book Store: Chitra and Pireeni 

3:00 – 5:15 Movie 2: Udaan (Flight) Introduced by Director, Vikramaditya 

5:15 – 5:20 Closing Remarks
5:30 ~End~
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