Crafts, Event, Family, Literary, Performance

Volunteer for Asian Pacific American Heritage Month 2013

Handmade storybook activity. Photo taken during the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Heritage Month Family Day 2011.

We are looking for volunteers who will be in the Washington, D.C. metro area on the weekend of May 4-5 to help with our upcoming two-day Asian Pacific American Heritage Month Family Festival. The festival is inspired by two new exhibitions: I Want the Wide American Earth: An Asian Pacific American Story and Nam Jun Paik: Global Visionary. This two-day kid-friendly event includes interactive performances, hands-on activities, presentations by local authors, conversations with a curator, gallery tours, a scavenger hunt, and much more.

Click here to view the full schedule
Click here to download the flyer (PDF)

Examples of tasks we need help with on May 4:

  • Talking to the public about their experiences during the festival and using a new evaluation system with iPads
  • Handmade book projects (view photos)
  • Video recording children and participants sharing their handmade books
  • Monitoring a video presentation station

If you think you would like to help out on either day, please contact Lydia Alcock at AlcockL@si.edu as soon as possible.  Please also feel free to forward this page to friends, family, and colleagues who may be interested in helping out.

May 4, 2013

I Want the Wide American Earth
Volunteer Orientation: 10:30am
Event: 11:30am – 4pm
Location: National Museum of American History
Address: 14th Street and Constitution Avenue, NW
Metro: Smithsonian, Federal Triangle
Website: http://apa.si.edu/heritage/

May 5, 2013

PaikBot Family Day
Volunteer Orientation: 10:30am
Event: 11:30am – 5pm
Location: Smithsonian American Art Museum, Kogod Courtyard
Address: 8th and F Streets, NW
Metro: Gallery Place/Chinatown
Website: Click here

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Art, Crafts, Event, Family, Performance

APA Heritage Month – Family Day 2012

Click to download the PDF postcard

May 6, 2012
11:30 a.m. — 3:00 p.m

Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery
Kogod Courtyard
8th and F Streets NW
Washington, DC 20001
Google Map

Metro: Gallery Place-Chinatown
Free and open to the public

Bring the whole family to the Smithsonian’s kickoff celebration of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month! Enjoy a fun-filled day sampling music and dance performances by local artists and engaging in challenging but child-friendly hands-on activities. This family day of activities centers on the exhibition, Portraiture Now: Asian American Portraits of Encounter. The Hirshhorn’s ARTLAB+ teens will be on hand to videotape interviews with interested visitors.

If you think you would like to help out at this event, please contact Lydia Alcock at alcockl@si.edu as soon as possible about volunteering. Please also feel free to forward this note to friends, family, and colleagues.

Schedule

11:45 a.m.
CYC Lion DanceLion Dance (Opening)
The Washington Chinese Youth Club (CYC) performs traditional Chinese Lion Dances at a variety of major events. Lion dance is a form of traditional dance in Chinese culture in which performers mimic a lion’s movements in a lion costume.
12:00 p.m. Remarks by Konrad Ng
Konrad NgKonrad Ng is the Director of the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program, which provides vision, leadership, and support for Asian and Pacific Islander American initiatives for the Smithsonian Institution.
12:15 p.m. South Asian Dance Performance by Dhroopad
Dhroopad is an all volunteer Bengali American cultural organization in the  DC Metro area with an objective to promote rich Bengali cultural heritage and to foster arts and literature as a force that transcends social, cultural and religious barriers and instigate compassion for humanity.
1:00 p.m. Spoken Word and Poetry Performances
Simone Jacobson. Photo by Roshan Karmali.The 2013 Asian Pacific Islander American (APIA) Spoken Word & Poetry Summit Artists are a gathering of spoken word artists, poets, writers, musicians, thespians, activists, organizers, and artists who convene based on the commonality of their Asian American, Asian, and/or Pacific Islander identity.
1:30 p.m. Storytelling with Mokihana
MokihanaOur storyteller, Mokihana, will share The Island-below-the-Star, by James Rumford, which tells of the adventure of five brothers and teaches Polynesian navigation skills.  Mokihana will teach the children hula motions to enhance the story and will share an original chant based on the book.
2:00 p.m. Book Reading & Signing with Sushimita Mazumdar
SushmitaSushmita Mazumdar is a D.C. area book artist, writer, and educator. She started writing stories for children when her children were little and made them into fun books by hand. Since then, she teaches art education programs for children as well as adult groups to encourage storytelling and passing on cultural heritage from one generation to the next.
2:15 p.m. Filipino American Dance Ensemble by MHC
FIlipino American PerformanceThe Migrant Heritage Commission (MHC) Filipino American Dance Ensemble is composed of talented youth and adults from various groups who trained for cultural events. The group is under the artistic direction of the Philippine Embassy’s former Cultural Officer & Attache’ Grace Valera.
2:45 p.m.
Lion Dance (Closing)
Performed by the Washington Chinese Youth Club (CYC)

 

Ongoing Activities

Ti Lei Bracelets
Ti Lei BraceletsTi leaves (lā`ī in Hawaiian) have had many uses in Hawaiian culture:  rain capes, roof waterproofing, cooking (as tin foil facsimile) and more.  Participants will learn a simple yet authentic lei-making method to make a bracelet that can be worn repeatedly by storing in the freezer.

Lion and Dragon Masks
Dragon MaskDecorate your own lion or dragon mask to celebrate the year of the dragon. The Lunar New Year is symbolized by a different animal zodiac each year, determined by a 12-year cycle. 2012 is the Year of the Dragon which is the most revered in the calendar.

Handmade Storybooks with Sushmita Mazumdar
Handmade StorybooksChildren and families can create a storybook illustrating their personal story. Sushmita Mazumdar and museum volunteers will provide directions and help.

Charcoal Drawings with Rebecca C. Adams
Charcoal DrawingsIn contemporary American culture hair type can indicate where you live, it can tell a story about your ancestors, and it can even be a form of creative self-expression.  Based on the artworks of Zhang Chun Hong in the Portraiture Now: Asian American Portraits of Encounter exhibit, visitors will create their own hair scroll “portraits” in charcoal to celebrate their individuality.

Clay Fortune Cookies
Clay fortune cookiesLearn how to make fortune cookies out of clay. The history of the fortune cookie dates back to Los Angeles, California. According to “Madam Chu’s Chinese Cooking School” (a book by Grace Zia Chu), George Jung invented the fortune cookie in Los Angeles, circa 1916. He either wanted to cheer up customers during WWI or entertain them while waiting for their food.

ARTLAB+
ARTLAB+ Student FilmingARTLAB+ is a digital media studio based at the Hirshhorn Sculpture Garden that gives teens the opportunity to become integral members of a design team. Production teams are inviting participants to share personal stories that relate to the theme of APA Heritage Month and the Portraiture Now exhibition. The footage is compiled into a montage video by an ARTLAB+ teen video editor.

Photo BoothPhoto Booth
Bring home memories by taking free photo booth pictures with your family and friends.

Special menu available at the Courtyard Café.

Related Links:

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Art, Crafts, Event, Family, Performance

Call for Volunteers: APA Heritage Month 2012

May 6, 2012
11:30 a.m. — 3:00 p.m

Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery
Kogod Courtyard
8th and F Streets NW
Washington, DC 20001
Google Map

Metro: Gallery Place-Chinatown
Free admission

We are looking for volunteers to help with our upcoming Asian Pacific American Heritage Month Family Day.

This family day of activities centers on the exhibition, Portraiture Now: Asian American Portraits of Encounter, and includes musical and dance performances, and a range of hands-on activities about portraiture and identity. The Hirshhorn’s Artlab+ teens will be on hand to videotape interviews with interested visitors.

If you think you would like to help out at this event, please contact Lydia Alcock at alcockl@si.edu as soon as possible.  Please also feel free to forward this note to friends, family, and colleagues.

Related Links:

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Chinese American, Crafts, Event, Family, Film, General APA

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month – Family Day Celebration

Saturday, May 7, 2011
11 a.m. — 4 p.m.
First Floor
National Museum of American History
14th Street and Constitution Ave, NW
Washington, DC 20004

The Killing of a Chinese Cookie
Film screening begins at 1 p.m.

Metro: Federal Triangle or Smithsonian
This event is free and open to the public.

Bring the whole family to the Smithsonian’s kickoff celebration for Asian Pacific American Heritage Month! This day of activities centers on Sweet & Sour, a display that traces the evolution of Chinese food in the United States and the long history of Chinese immigration. Visitors can watch the film, The Killing of a Chinese Cookie, join a discussion with director Derek Shimoda, and participate in many hands-on activities. Children and their families can work with artist Sushmita Mazumdar to create a storybook illustrating a personal story from their own kitchen. Teens from the Hirshhorn’s ARTLAB+ video production program will then interview the children and record their stories, producing videos for the families and for posting on the site www.SmithsonianEducation.org/Heritage.  There will also be curator talks with Cedric Yeh, Deputy Chair and Associate Curator in the Division of Armed Forces History at NMAH. He is also the Co-Chair for the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Committee.

APA Heritage  Month

Schedule

11:00 a.m. Curator Talk with Cedric Yeh
Sweet & Sour exhibition case, East Special Artifact Wall
12:00 p.m. Curator Talk with Cedric Yeh
Sweet & Sour exhibition case, East Special Artifact Wall
1:00 p.m. Screening of The Killing of a Chinese Cookie
Followed by Q&A with film director Derek Shimoda
Carmichael Auditorium
3:00 p.m. DVD and book signing with Derek Shimoda and Sushmita Mazumdar
LeFrak Lobby, by entrance to Carmichael Auditorium
3:30 p.m. Curator Talk with Cedric Yeh
Sweet & Sour exhibition case, East Special Artifact Wall

Ongoing Activities

Handmade Storybooks with Sushmita Mazumdar
LeFrak Lobby, by entrance to Carmichael Auditorium
Starts on the hour and half hour

Make Clay Fortune Cookies
Activity area at Sweet & Sour exhibition case, East Special Artifact Wall
Special thanks to Meiwah Restaurant for their support of this activity.

Record Your Family Story on Camera
Presidential Suite, 12-2 p.m. and 2:30-4 p.m.
Special thanks to the Pearson Foundation for their support of this activity.

APA bookshelf at the American History Museum bookstore

APA bookshelf at the American History Museum bookstore

Chopsticks and Spices Carts
First Floor

Cookbook Sales
LeFrak Lobby, by entrance to Carmichael Auditorium

Special Asian Café Menu
Stars and Stripes Café, First Floor

Related Links:

Smithsonian Participants:

Southwest Airlines

Air travel for participants is provided by Southwest Airlines.


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Academic, Art, Chinese American, Crafts, Event, Family, Filipino American, Folklife Festival, General APA, Hawaiian, History, Indian American, Japanese American, Korean American, Lecture, Performance, Social, South Asian, Vietnamese American

Smithsonian Folklife Festival to begin, wood sculpture welcomes visitors

The stage is waiting for you

As the 2010 Smithsonian Folklife Festival quickly approaches, the National Mall in Washington, DC resonates with the sounds of hammers on wood as workers prepare the stages, tents, and other physical structures that will house the myriad participants teaching mall visitors about everything from the culture and history of Mexico to the foodways and community experiences of Asian Pacific Americans today to how exhibitions at the Smithsonian are put together.

Wooden sculpture by Foon Sham

Standing under the over 90-degree (maybe even 100-degree) heat, quietly waiting for the festival to start, a structure of wooden panels seem particularly welcoming in a grassy area under the trees. Upon closer inspection, names and words of greeting in at least four or five different languages are beginning to fill this signature wall.

Designed by Foon Sham, professor of fine arts at the University of Maryland, College Park, this wooden sculpture resembles a giant guest book. Visitors and passers-by of the National Mall over the course of the Folklife Festival are asked to sign it with their names and contribute one-word descriptions of themselves or their professions.

Wooden sculpture by Foon Sham

The presence of the wooden sculptures symbolizes a welcoming to visitors of all backgrounds. This is significant because such a welcome was not always the case for Asian Pacific Americans—both native-born Americans and more recent immigrants—as can be seen in the various exclusion acts in U.S. history. Signing the sculpture along its vertical panels reminds us that, in context of a globalizing world, languages are not always written horizontally from left to right. Specifically, it reminds us of the several Asian languages written vertically. While the signatures on the wood will fade over time (as purposefully designed), the memories created at the Festival will not disappear but will affect us and our global relations for years to come.

Foon Sham is also the artist of The Glory of the Chinese Descendents, a wall sculpture at the Chinatown-Gallery Place metro station leading into Chinatown in Washington, DC.

Be sure to come visit the Smithsonian Folklife Festival, which runs June 24-28 and July 1-5, 2010, everyday from 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on the Mall with evening events throughout the greater DC area after 5:30 p.m.

Check the Folklife Festival website for the full schedule and more details.

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Crafts, Event, Family, Film, Folklife Festival, General APA, Performance

2010 Smithsonian Folklife Festival featuring Asian Pacifc Americans: Local Lives, Global Ties

2010 Smithsonian Folklife Festival: Asian Pacific American Connections. Dancers from the Madison Chinese Dance Academy in Potomac, Maryland, take part in celebrating Mekong American heritage at the 2007 Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Photo by Richard Strauss, Smithsonian Institution.

For the first time in 44 years, the 2010 Folklife Festival will focus on Asian Pacific Americans from the Greater Washington, DC area, who are a microcosm of the 15 million APAs who live all across the United States. The festival will take place June 24-28 and July 1-5 on the National Mall. This annual festival attracts over a million visitors from around the country and the world, with another 6 million visiting the website and about 40 million learning about it through other media coverage.

Many thanks to over 100 generous donors who contributed to the APA segment of the festival. APA programming at the 2010 Smithsonian Folklife Festival will educate audiences about what it means to be a person of Asian descent living in the United States today. It will bring together an array of 100 tradition-bearers from diverse communities to highlight the richness of APA cultures through demonstrations of music, dance, cuisine, visual arts, martial arts, spirituality, and technology, as well as discussions and scholarly forums on issues relating to Asian Pacific American identity, history, and culture.

Save the dates and please join us for this historic event. For more information, visit our website or the Folklife Festival website.

Also, check out how to volunteer at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.

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Art, Crafts, Event, Family, General APA, Japanese American

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month Family Day

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month Family Day

Art of Gaman

APA Heritage Month Family Day centers on the exhibition The Art of Gaman: Arts and Crafts from the Japanese American Internment Camps. Enjoy exhibition-themed stories from Anne Shimojima, music and dance performances, traditional games, a scavenger hunt, making origami, and “garden journal” activities.

Date:
Saturday, May 1, 2010
11 a.m. – 2 p.m.
 
Location:
Renwick Gallery, Grand Salon
Smithsonian American Art Museum
Pennsylvania Avenue and 17th Street, NW
 
Metro:
Farragut West
(Blue and Orange Lines)
17th Street exit
 
This event is free and open to the public.

This is the third feature event of the 2010 Smithsonian Heritage Month family-day series, titled “Tapestry of Cultural Rhythms,” which explores the dynamism of cultural expression.

Smithsonian participants: Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Heritage Committee, Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program, Smithsonian Center for Education and Museum Studies, and Smithsonian Heritage Months Steering Committee

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